CLASS TRIPS 

Each year, ASB offers a small number of class trips in addition to our regularly scheduled trips. Our class trips are advertised the quarter before the class takes place, and interested students may apply to the trip(s) of their choice.

 

Accepted students enroll in a student-led seminar for winter quarter in order to learn about their site and social issue more deeply. The seminars are offered pass/no credit only, and students are awarded one SESP credit that can be used towards graduation.

 

This winter break, we are offering a trip to OutFront Minnesota, an LGBTQ+ organization, with the associated class taking place

during fall quarter. We are also planning two additional class trips during spring break to Mission:Wolf and The Farm. Explore the class/site descriptions below.

 

 

 

Any proposals for new class trips are welcomed! If you have any questions, contact us for more information.

how to get involved

2019 Spring Class trips

Mission: Wolf

Westcliffe, Colorado

The Mission: Wolf trip will travel to Westcliffe, Colorado this spring break to volunteer at a wolf sanctuary. There, we will work with the full time staff to support MW's everyday operations in taking care of the 32 wolves they keep. While at the sanctuary, participants will get the chance to interact face-to-face with the wolves.
This class will give participants a greater understanding of the history of predators and predator control in the United States, conservation, ecology, and sustainability, and the role of wolves in the environment. The course will also explore the concepts of environmental policy, wolf behavior and social structure, and the relationship between humans and wolves.

The Farm

Summertown, Tennessee

Born. Go to school. Get a job. Get married. Buy a house. Have kids. Retire. Die. This is the traditional path that American society (and Northwestern) has laid out for us, and many of us really don’t question it. But in the 1960s and 70s, small groups of people did begin to ask questions. This class will explore the new societies, called intentional communities, this movement created: Are they just a bunch of crazy hippies, or are they a functioning community? How do they confront the problems they saw with mainstream society, such as capitalism, consumerism and industrial farming? What are they doing today, and could their alternative lifestyles provide any solutions to our society's problems?

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Past Class Trips

2018 Fall Class Trip​

OUT to Serve

 

The Fall 2018 class going to a LGBTQ non-profit over Winter Break to work closely with issues that affect queer communities. The class will focus on gender and sexuality, LGBTQ history, queer and feminist theories, and related disciplines that have long and unique histories. We’ll also analyze modern representation of queer communities like Queer Eye, Saturday Church, documentaries, and comic books. We’ll have plenty of queer memes, ridiculous jokes, and ASBonding! We invite people of all identities and backgrounds, all we ask is a level of introspection and a willingness to learn.

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2018 Spring Class trips

Mission: Wolf

Westcliffe, Colorado

The Mission: Wolf trip will travel to Westcliffe, Colorado this spring break to volunteer at a wolf sanctuary. There, we will work with the full time staff to support MW's everyday operations in taking care of the 32 wolves they keep. While at the sanctuary, participants will get the chance to interact face-to-face with the wolves.
This class will give participants a greater understanding of the history of predators and predator control in the United States, conservation, ecology, and sustainability, and the role of wolves in the environment. The course will also explore the concepts of environmental policy, wolf behavior and social structure, and the relationship between humans and wolves.

The Farm

Summertown, Tennessee

Born. Go to school. Get a job. Get married. Buy a house. Have kids. Retire. Die. This is the traditional path that American society (and Northwestern) has laid out for us, and many of us really don’t question it. But in the 1960s and 70s, small groups of people did begin to ask questions. This class will explore the new societies, called intentional communities, this movement created: Are they just a bunch of crazy hippies, or are they a functioning community? How do they confront the problems they saw with mainstream society, such as capitalism, consumerism and industrial farming? What are they doing today, and could their alternative lifestyles provide any solutions to our society's problems?

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2017 Fall Class trip

Cheyenne River Youth Project

Eagle Butte, South dakota

Class Trip Leaders this year will lead a course and trip to Cheyenne River Youth Project, a non-profit youth and family center located on the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota. In the course, students will explore topics like the history and culture of the Lakota, the history of settler colonialism in the United States, laws and treaties that shaped the current reservation system, and modern issues relating to native peoples, including but not limited to poverty, race, class, and environmental racism.

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